Monday, November 16, 2015

Le feu sacré

Ozias Leduc source

I had arrived at the country house on the night of Friday the 13th, where in general we dine by candle light. It had been a fairly long drive with some heavy traffic where it wasn't expected. But we were happy to arrive, light the fires and begin a peaceful weekend. We didn't know what had happened back in Paris. Then just before going to bed, my worried sister called from the US thinking we were still at the apartment.

Sometimes we know there is far too much said of tragedy in the media - classic and social - and our minutes of silence could easily be multiplied by 1000.  Yet how is it possible to speak again of art, of beauty, fabrics, decoration and other privileged preoccupations in a blog such as mine without aknowledging our mourning after the barbarous acts of terror in our beloved Paris,
in our beloved world ?

The right words lack before the gravity of this situation 
but words are the first things we have at our disposition to find unity. And because in communicating we reinforce our courage, I have borrowed these from Edmond Rostand's proud Chantecler, 

C’est la nuit qu’il est beau de croire à la lumière.
It's at night that faith in the light is admirable.

13 comments:

  1. Oh Gesbi, so glad you posted to let us know you are well and safe. Words are lost on such sick people. After 9/11, I and my daughters went ahead with a trip we had planned and traveled around Europe and Paris. We were not going to let the terrorists win. It was our way of showing them they would never win, because good will always prevail over evil. We are all together with our heads held high.

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    1. The good side of all this is that we realise what is essential. Thank you, Donna.

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  2. Glad to hear you and your family are safe. We are all Paris.

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    1. It's great to hear from you, HbD. Thank you!

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  3. lovely. thank you. more life affirming than my own effort. stay safe. do, please.

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    1. Ah, but I loved your post and also that we both recognize a certain reticence before the facts.
      It's not an easy package to wrap. Thanks for your comment.

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  4. I'm very glad you are safe and my heart goes out to you. I wish the hope and fears had not been reduced to Instagram images and slogans because this is perhaps the greatest crisis of all - the battle between the light and the dark. All my best.

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    1. Thank you very much, Blue. It means a lot to have support from friends near and far.

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  5. "...how is it possible to speak again of art, of beauty, fabrics, decoration and other privileged preoccupations...", yet we must go on and not cave into defeat.

    So glad you are safe.

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    1. Thank you, dear Lady Domus. We agree. I try to keep this a preserved space, but - rare for me - I couldn't go on this time without making mention of what had happened. There is mourning but not defeat!

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  6. Hope you are OK one week after the atrocities in Paris. It will take time for the nervousness to subside; not even keeping vigilant helps in these circumstances, but you have to be brave and go on with your life.

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    1. Thank you, Columnist. I know you have gone through some worrisome moments, too. Life carries you along anyway. It doesn't stop!

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